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about:describing_principles [2013-03-28 11:51]
christian improved and updated
about:describing_principles [2013-09-05 20:28]
christian
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 Following the principle may have a negative impact on aspects addressed by other principles. These contrary principles are listed here and the consequence is explained. Like there is no guarantee that the principle itself is valid in every case, there is also no guarantee that there is the negative effect concerning the other principles. There is just a high probability that there is this effect. Therefore these principles should also be considered if this one is applied. Following the principle may have a negative impact on aspects addressed by other principles. These contrary principles are listed here and the consequence is explained. Like there is no guarantee that the principle itself is valid in every case, there is also no guarantee that there is the negative effect concerning the other principles. There is just a high probability that there is this effect. Therefore these principles should also be considered if this one is applied.
  
-As the relationships are purely for navigational purposes, the ``is-contrary-to'' ​relationship is not necessarily symmetric.+As the relationships are purely for navigational purposes, the "is-contrary-to" ​relationship is not necessarily symmetric.
  
 ==== Complementary Principles ==== ==== Complementary Principles ====
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 A principle is always a reduction of the given design problem to a very specific aspect or effect. Other principles have to be considered too in order to have a full picture of the design problem. Sometimes when one principle is considered, another one is very likely to be relevant too despite not being contrary. This is then a complementary principle. As for the other relations this is just a tendency and a purely navigational relationship. In practice a complementary principle may also be contrary or not applicable. A principle is always a reduction of the given design problem to a very specific aspect or effect. Other principles have to be considered too in order to have a full picture of the design problem. Sometimes when one principle is considered, another one is very likely to be relevant too despite not being contrary. This is then a complementary principle. As for the other relations this is just a tendency and a purely navigational relationship. In practice a complementary principle may also be contrary or not applicable.
  
-Similar to ``is-contrary-to``, the ``is-complementary-to'' ​relationship is not necessarily symmetric.+Similar to "is-contrary-to", the "is-complementary-to" ​relationship is not necessarily symmetric.
  
 ==== Principle Collections ==== ==== Principle Collections ====
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 ===== Examples ===== ===== Examples =====
  
-One or more self-contained examples explains how the principle distinguishes ​``good'' ​and ``bad'' solutions with respect to the aspect the principle is about or exemplifies certain relationships,​ strategies, caveats, etc.+One or more self-contained examples explains how the principle distinguishes ​"good" ​and "bad"' solutions with respect to the aspect the principle is about or exemplifies certain relationships,​ strategies, caveats, etc.
  
  
about/describing_principles.txt · Last modified: 2013-09-05 20:28 by christian